JDP Invitational IV

The fourth annual JDP Invitational crowned its fourth new champion last week, with Laura Walsh claiming the green candle.

Her net 71 was the first score posted and sat there begging for a challenger that never materialized. The other four players all failed to break 80 with their net scores. Defending champion Debbie Peters made an early run in her round, canning two par putts longer than 40 feet, but followed with five straight disaster holes to shoot herself out of it.

“I was on tilt,” Debbie said.

As defending champ, Debbie chose the venue of the Palms, where Walsh started slow before stringing together several pars on her back nine. She shot a gross 91 with a 20 handicap.

“I’m pretty happy with my score; sets up a good challenge for everyone,” Laura wrote in a text message.

Sean Walsh and Jeremy Peters battled high winds and stomach issues and shot extremely high scores. John Peters was derailed by a triple-bogey on the par-5 opening hole and never found his stride.

Laura joins John, Jeremy and Debbie on the list of JDP Invitational champions. The tournament is unlikely to continue due to scheduling dilemmas, but we shall see what next year brings.

Passing Don’s wisdom on to writers

I continued my reading of Don Quixote this morning and stumbled across a passage that could easily apply to writers in today’s world.

In the passage, Sancho Panza asks Quixote why he continues to wander around doing great deeds that nobody will ever see or hear about. Why doesn’t Quixote go into the service of a great king somewhere, a king who can fund his journey with money and the best weapons and supplies?

This made me think of a modern-day writer who might think it isn’t worth writing anything that can’t get published by a big publishing house.

Here is Quixote’s answer:

“There is something in what you say, Sancho, but before one reaches that stage one must wander about the world on probation as it were, in search of adventures, so that, by bringing some of them to a happy conclusion, one gains such fame and renown that when one does go to some great monarch’s court one is known as a knight by one’s deeds; and as soon as all the boys in the street see one riding through the city gates, they follow one and come swarming around one and shouting: ‘This is the Knight of the Sun’ or of the Serpent or whatever device it is under which one has performed great exploits.”

So, a writer should write and write and write all over the internet and make a name for him or her self. If the writing is worth reading, people will read it and someday the big publishing houses will come chasing after the writer, instead of the other way around.

Write every day

One of the biggest lessons I learned in my journalistic days was that sometimes people like the dumbest stories. No, what I mean is, you never can tell what people are going to like. I would turn in stories I loved and hear nothing from anyone and I would turn in stories I hated and have compliments tossed my way. Point being, there were a bunch of stories I never would have written if it weren’t for a deadline and those stories brought a smile to somebody’s face, sometimes. So, that’s why I am rambling on late at night. I was about to go to bed with nothing on my mind to write about, but here I am.

If you have a crazy book idea, write it up and publish it. You never know, somebody might enjoy it. If nobody enjoys it, so what. Most of us are glad Charles Dickens wrote Great Expectations, but have you ever tried to wade through the Pickwick Papers? Then again, somebody out there probably loved the Pickwick Papers.